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June 26, 2006

Response of cluster headache to psilocybin and LSD

June 27, 2006 issue
66 (12) 1920-1922

Abstract

The authors interviewed 53 cluster headache patients who had used psilocybin or lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to treat their condition. Twenty-two of 26 psilocybin users reported that psilocybin aborted attacks; 25 of 48 psilocybin users and 7 of 8 LSD users reported cluster period termination; 18 of 19 psilocybin users and 4 of 5 LSD users reported remission period extension. Research on the effects of psilocybin and LSD on cluster headache may be warranted.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 66Number 12June 27, 2006
Pages: 1920-1922
PubMed: 16801660

Publication History

Published online: June 26, 2006
Published in print: June 27, 2006

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

R. Andrew Sewell, MD
From the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory (J.H.H., H.G.P.) and Clinical Research Laboratory (R.A.S.), Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Center, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA.
John H. Halpern, MD
From the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory (J.H.H., H.G.P.) and Clinical Research Laboratory (R.A.S.), Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Center, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA.
Harrison G. Pope, Jr, MD
From the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory (J.H.H., H.G.P.) and Clinical Research Laboratory (R.A.S.), Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Center, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. R. Andrew Sewell, Oaks Building, ADARC, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478; e-mail: [email protected].

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