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November 13, 2006

Memory complaints are related to Alzheimer disease pathology in older persons

November 14, 2006 issue
67 (9) 1581-1585

Abstract

Objective: To study the relationship between Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology and memory complaints proximate to death.
Methods: A group of 90 older persons underwent detailed clinical evaluations and brain autopsy at death. The evaluations included administration of questions on subjective memory complaints and clinical classification of dementia and AD. On postmortem examination, neuritic plaques, diffuse plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles in tissue samples from five cortical regions were counted, and a summary measure of overall AD pathology was derived. In addition, amyloid load and tau tangles were quantified in eight regions.
Results: In multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, and education, memory complaints were associated with AD pathology, including both amyloid and tau tangles. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the relationship between memory complaints and AD pathology was present in those with and without dementia, and could not be explained by the potentially confounding effects of depressive symptoms or coexisting common chronic health problems.
Conclusion: Memory complaints in older persons may indicate self awareness of a degenerative process.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 67Number 9November 14, 2006
Pages: 1581-1585
PubMed: 17101887

Publication History

Published online: November 13, 2006
Published in print: November 14, 2006

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

L. L. Barnes, PhD
From Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center (L.L.B., J.A.S., P.A.B., D.A.B.) and Rush Institute for Healthy Aging (J.L.B.) and Departments of Neurological Sciences (L.L.B., J.A.S., D.A.B.), Internal Medicine (J.L.B.), and Behavioral Sciences (L.L.B., P.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
J. A. Schneider, MD
From Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center (L.L.B., J.A.S., P.A.B., D.A.B.) and Rush Institute for Healthy Aging (J.L.B.) and Departments of Neurological Sciences (L.L.B., J.A.S., D.A.B.), Internal Medicine (J.L.B.), and Behavioral Sciences (L.L.B., P.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
P. A. Boyle, PhD
From Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center (L.L.B., J.A.S., P.A.B., D.A.B.) and Rush Institute for Healthy Aging (J.L.B.) and Departments of Neurological Sciences (L.L.B., J.A.S., D.A.B.), Internal Medicine (J.L.B.), and Behavioral Sciences (L.L.B., P.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
J. L. Bienias, ScD
From Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center (L.L.B., J.A.S., P.A.B., D.A.B.) and Rush Institute for Healthy Aging (J.L.B.) and Departments of Neurological Sciences (L.L.B., J.A.S., D.A.B.), Internal Medicine (J.L.B.), and Behavioral Sciences (L.L.B., P.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
D. A. Bennett, MD
From Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center (L.L.B., J.A.S., P.A.B., D.A.B.) and Rush Institute for Healthy Aging (J.L.B.) and Departments of Neurological Sciences (L.L.B., J.A.S., D.A.B.), Internal Medicine (J.L.B.), and Behavioral Sciences (L.L.B., P.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Lisa L. Barnes, Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Armour Academic Facility, 600 S. Paulina, Suite 1038, Chicago, IL 60612; e-mail: [email protected]

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