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December 11, 2006

Rehabilitation of limb apraxia improves daily life activities in patients with stroke

December 12, 2006 issue
67 (11) 2050-2052

Abstract

We randomly assigned 33 patients with left hemisphere stroke, limb apraxia, and aphasia to an apraxia or a control (aphasia) treatment group. Before and after each treatment, patients underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological testing battery and a caregiver evaluation of patient’s activities of daily life (ADL) independence. Apraxia severity was related with ADL independence. Control (aphasia) treatment improved patients’ language and intelligence performance. Apraxia treatment specifically improved praxic function and ADL.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 67Number 11December 12, 2006
Pages: 2050-2052
PubMed: 17159119

Publication History

Published online: December 11, 2006
Published in print: December 12, 2006

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

N. Smania, MD
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
S. M. Aglioti, PhD
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
F. Girardi, SP, PT
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
M. Tinazzi, PhD
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
A. Fiaschi, PhD
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
A. Cosentino, MD
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.
E. Corato, MD
From the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Unit (N.S.), “G.B. Rossi” University Hospital, Verona; Department of Psychology (S.M.A.), University of Rome (“La Sapienza”); “C. Santi” Rehabilitation Centre (F.G., A.C.), Verona; Department of Neurological and Vision Sciences (M.T., A.F., E.C.), Neurorehabilitation Section, University of Verona; and Neurology Unit (M.T.), “Maggiore” University Hospital, Verona, Italy.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Nicola Smania, Centro di Rieducazione Funzionale Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Via L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134 Verona, Italy; e-mail: [email protected]

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  1. Interventions to improve the occupational performance of people with post stroke with upper limb apraxia – A systematic review and meta-analysis, British Journal of Occupational Therapy, (2023).https://doi.org/10.1177/03080226231201738
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  2. Limb Apraxias: The Influence of Higher Order Perceptual and Semantic Deficits in Motor Recovery After Stroke, Stroke, 54, 1, (30-43), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.122.037948
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  3. Apraxie, neuroreha, 15, 01, (29-35), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1055/a-2000-9164
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  9. Clinical Aspects of Apraxia, Encyclopedia of Behavioral Neuroscience, 2nd edition, (630-639), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-819641-0.00139-0
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  10. Improvement of Apraxia With Augmented Reality: Influencing Pantomime of Tool Use via Holographic Cues, Frontiers in Neurology, 12, (2021).https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2021.711900
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