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November 26, 2007

Risk factor status and vascular events in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis

November 27, 2007 issue
69 (22) 2063-2068

Abstract

Background: There are limited data on the relationship between control of vascular risk factors and vascular events in patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis.
Methods: We utilized the Warfarin Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease study database to analyze vascular and lifestyle risk factors at baseline and averaged over the course of the trial. Cutoff levels defining good control for each factor were prespecified based on national guidelines. Endpoints evaluated included 1) ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death or 2) ischemic stroke alone. Univariate associations were assessed using the log-rank test and multivariable analysis was done using Cox proportional hazards regression.
Results: From baseline until year 2 follow-up, there was not a significant improvement in blood pressure control. During the same period, there were improvements in patients with total cholesterol <200 mg/dL (54.6% to 79.2%, p < 0.001) or low-density lipoprotein <100 mg/dL (28.7% to 55.9%, p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg (HR = 1.79, p = 0.0009, 95% confidence limits 1.27 to 2.52), no alcohol consumption (HR 1.69, 1.21 to 2.39, p = 0.002), and cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL (HR 1.44, 1.004 to 2.07, p = 0.048) were associated with an increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death. The same risk factors were predictors of ischemic stroke alone in multivariable analysis.
Conclusions: Elevated blood pressure and cholesterol levels in symptomatic patients with intracranial stenosis are associated with an increased risk of stroke and other major vascular events.

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Information & Authors

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Published In

Neurology®
Volume 69Number 22November 27, 2007
Pages: 2063-2068
PubMed: 18040012

Publication History

Published online: November 26, 2007
Published in print: November 27, 2007

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Affiliations & Disclosures

S. Chaturvedi, MD
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
T. N. Turan, MD
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
M. J. Lynn, MS
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
S. E. Kasner, MD
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
J. Romano, MD
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
G. Cotsonis, MA
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
M. Frankel, MD
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
M. I. Chimowitz, MB, ChB
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.
For the WASID Study Group
From the Department of Neurology (S.C.), Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Department of Neurology (T.N.T., M.F., M.I.C.), Emory University, Atlanta; Department of Biostatistics (M.J.L., G.C.), Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Department of Neurology (S.E.K.), University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and Department of Neurology (J.R.), University of Miami, FL.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Seemant Chaturvedi, Stroke Program and Department of Neurology, Wayne State University, 8C-UHC, 4201 St. Antoine, Detroit, MI 48201 [email protected]

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