Skip to main content
AAN.com
×
Site maintenance Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Please note that new registrations and purchases will be unavailable on this date.
Articles
January 4, 2012

Linking MRI to daily life experience
The example of poststroke depression

January 31, 2012 issue
78 (5) 322-325

Abstract

Objective:

The state-of-the-art tools of neurology, in particular modern neuroimaging techniques, have yet to benefit from the revolution in mobile technologies that provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying clinical syndromes. This study demonstrates the manner in which mobile technologies may provide information that is complementary to MRI data, using the illustration of poststroke depression.

Methods:

MRI examinations were provided to 15 stroke patients, followed by computerized ambulatory monitoring of daily life experiences over 1 week.

Results:

The occurrence of daily life events was significantly associated with the intensity of positive affect during the ambulatory monitoring period. This emotional reactivity was also significantly associated with functional connectivity in brain regions linked with the risk of depression 3 months following stroke.

Conclusions:

Novel mobile technologies provide information that is inaccessible to hospital-based tests, and allow for more complete investigations of disorder expression and etiology.

Get full access to this article

View all available purchase options and get full access to this article.

Supplementary Material

File (wnl.0b013e3182452985.pdf)

REFERENCES

1.
Johnson EI, Grondin O, Barrault M, et al. Computerized ambulatory monitoring in psychiatry: a multi-site collaborative study of acceptability, compliance, and reactivity. Int J Methods Psychiatr Res 2009; 18: 48– 57 .
2.
Johnson EI, Sibon I, Renou P, et al. Feasibility and validity of computerized ambulatory monitoring in stroke patients. Neurology 2009; 73: 1579– 1583 .
3.
Williams JBW. A structured interview guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1988; 45: 742– 747 .
4.
Kouwenhoven SE, Kirkevold M, Engedal K, Kim HS. Depression in acute stroke: Prevalence, dominant symptoms and associated factors. A systematic literature review. Disabil Rehabil 2011; 33: 539– 556 .
5.
Aben I, Verhey F, Strik J, et al. A comparative study into the one year cumulative incidence of depression after stroke and myocardial infarction. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2003; 74: 581– 585 .
6.
Andersen G, Vestergaard K, Riis J, Lauritzen L. Incidence of post-stroke depression during the first year in a large unselected stroke population determined using a valid standardized rating scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1994; 90: 190– 195 .
7.
Joormann J, Siemer M, Gotlib IH. Mood regulation in depression: differential effects of distraction and recall of happy memories on sad mood. J Abnorm Psychol 2007; 116: 484– 490 .
8.
Morris BH, Bylsma LM, Rottenberg J. Does emotion predict the course of major depressive disorder? A review of prospective studies. Br J Clin Psychol 2009; 48: 255– 273 .
9.
Leppänen JM. Emotional information processing in mood disorders: a review of behavioral and neuroimaging findings. Curr Opin Psychiatry 2006; 19: 34– 39 .
10.
National Institutes of Health. Mobile technologies and health care. NIH Medline Plus 2011; 5: 2– 3 .

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 78Number 5January 31, 2012
Pages: 322-325
PubMed: 22218270

Publication History

Received: May 23, 2011
Accepted: July 18, 2011
Published online: January 4, 2012
Published in print: January 31, 2012

Permissions

Request permissions for this article.

Disclosure

S. Lassalle-Lagadec, Dr. Allard, Dr. Dilharreguy, and P. Schweitzer report no disclosures. Dr. Swendsen received support for this investigation from a CNRS ATIP grant. Dr. Sibon received support for this investigation from The French Neurovascular Society.

Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

S. Lassalle-Lagadec
From the National Center for Scientific Research (INCIA, CNRS 5287) (S.L.-L., M.A., B.D., P.S., J.S., I.S.), Bordeaux; CHU Bordeaux (M.A., I.S.), Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux; and EPHE (M.A.), Paris, France.
M. Allard, MD, PhD
From the National Center for Scientific Research (INCIA, CNRS 5287) (S.L.-L., M.A., B.D., P.S., J.S., I.S.), Bordeaux; CHU Bordeaux (M.A., I.S.), Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux; and EPHE (M.A.), Paris, France.
B. Dilharreguy, PhD
From the National Center for Scientific Research (INCIA, CNRS 5287) (S.L.-L., M.A., B.D., P.S., J.S., I.S.), Bordeaux; CHU Bordeaux (M.A., I.S.), Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux; and EPHE (M.A.), Paris, France.
P. Schweitzer, MS
From the National Center for Scientific Research (INCIA, CNRS 5287) (S.L.-L., M.A., B.D., P.S., J.S., I.S.), Bordeaux; CHU Bordeaux (M.A., I.S.), Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux; and EPHE (M.A.), Paris, France.
J. Swendsen, PhD
From the National Center for Scientific Research (INCIA, CNRS 5287) (S.L.-L., M.A., B.D., P.S., J.S., I.S.), Bordeaux; CHU Bordeaux (M.A., I.S.), Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux; and EPHE (M.A.), Paris, France.
I. Sibon, MD, PhD
From the National Center for Scientific Research (INCIA, CNRS 5287) (S.L.-L., M.A., B.D., P.S., J.S., I.S.), Bordeaux; CHU Bordeaux (M.A., I.S.), Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux; and EPHE (M.A.), Paris, France.

Notes

Study funding: Supported by grant support from The French Neurovascular Society (Dr. Sibon) and an ATIP award from the CNRS (Dr. Swendsen).
Correspondence & reprint requests to Dr. Swendsen: [email protected]

Author Contributions

Saioa Lassalle-Lagadec contributed to data collection, writing the manuscript, and performing statistical analyses. Dr. Michèle Allard contributed to developing the study design, data collection, and writing the manuscript. Dr. Bixente Dilharreguy contributed to developing the study design. Pierre Schweitzer contributed to performing the literature review and writing the manuscript. Dr. Joel Swendsen contributed to developing the study design, writing the manuscript, and performing statistical analyses. Dr. Igor Sibon contributed to developing the study design, data collection, and writing the manuscript.

Metrics & Citations

Metrics

Citations

Download Citations

If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice. Select your manager software from the list below and click Download.

Cited By
  1. Non-electroencephalogram-based seizure detection devices: State of the art and future perspectives, Epilepsy & Behavior, 148, (109486), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2023.109486
    Crossref
  2. Contributions of mobile technologies to addiction research, Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, 18, 2, (213-221), (2022).https://doi.org/10.31887/DCNS.2016.18.2/jswendsen
    Crossref
  3. Modèle en réseau et troubles mentaux : application et intérêts dans la dépression post-AVC, L'Encéphale, 47, 4, (334-340), (2021).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.encep.2020.08.007
    Crossref
  4. Ecological Momentary Assessment in Patients With an Acquired Brain Injury: A Pilot Study on Compliance and Fluctuations, Frontiers in Neurology, 11, (2020).https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2020.00115
    Crossref
  5. Combining Standard Conventional Measures and Ecological Momentary Assessment of Depression, Anxiety and Coping Using Smartphone Application in Minor Stroke Population: A Longitudinal Study Protocol, Frontiers in Psychology, 8, (2017).https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01172
    Crossref
  6. Neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke, Nature Reviews Neurology, 12, 5, (269-280), (2016).https://doi.org/10.1038/nrneurol.2016.46
    Crossref
  7. Cross-species approaches to pathological gambling: A review targeting sex differences, adolescent vulnerability and ecological validity of research tools, Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 37, 10, (2454-2471), (2013).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2013.07.005
    Crossref
  8. Recommendations for ICT use in Alzheimer’s disease assessment: Monaco CTAD expert meeting, The journal of nutrition, health & aging, 17, 8, (653-660), (2013).https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-013-0046-3
    Crossref
  9. Mobile technologies in psychiatry: providing new perspectives from biology to culture, World Psychiatry, 11, 3, (196-198), (2013).https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2051-5545.2012.tb00131.x
    Crossref
  10. Comment: Mobile technology in neurology, Neurology, 78, 5, (323-323), (2012)./doi/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182452985
    Abstract
Loading...

View Options

Get Access

Login options

Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution to get full access on this article.

Personal login Institutional Login
Purchase Options

Purchase this article to get full access to it.

Purchase Access, $39 for 24hr of access

View options

Full Text

View Full Text

Full Text HTML

View Full Text HTML

Media

Figures

Other

Tables

Share

Share

Share article link

Share