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Clinical/Scientific Notes
June 1, 1999

Elimination of oxcarbazepine-induced oculogyric crisis following vagus nerve stimulation

June 1, 1999 issue
52 (9) 1918

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 52Number 9June 1, 1999
Pages: 1918
PubMed: 10371552

Publication History

Received: August 5, 1998
Accepted: February 5, 1999
Published online: June 1, 1999
Published in print: June 1, 1999

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

S.D. Gatzonis, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Drs. GatzonisStamboulis, and Siafakas), “Aeginition” Hospital, Athens Medical School; the Neurosurgery Clinic (Dr. Singounas), “Evangelismos” Hospital, Athens, Greece; and the Department of Neurosurgery (Drs. Georgaculias and Jenkins), Newcastle General Hospital, UK.
N. Georgaculias, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Drs. GatzonisStamboulis, and Siafakas), “Aeginition” Hospital, Athens Medical School; the Neurosurgery Clinic (Dr. Singounas), “Evangelismos” Hospital, Athens, Greece; and the Department of Neurosurgery (Drs. Georgaculias and Jenkins), Newcastle General Hospital, UK.
E. Singounas, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Drs. GatzonisStamboulis, and Siafakas), “Aeginition” Hospital, Athens Medical School; the Neurosurgery Clinic (Dr. Singounas), “Evangelismos” Hospital, Athens, Greece; and the Department of Neurosurgery (Drs. Georgaculias and Jenkins), Newcastle General Hospital, UK.
A. Jenkins, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Drs. GatzonisStamboulis, and Siafakas), “Aeginition” Hospital, Athens Medical School; the Neurosurgery Clinic (Dr. Singounas), “Evangelismos” Hospital, Athens, Greece; and the Department of Neurosurgery (Drs. Georgaculias and Jenkins), Newcastle General Hospital, UK.
E. Stamboulis, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Drs. GatzonisStamboulis, and Siafakas), “Aeginition” Hospital, Athens Medical School; the Neurosurgery Clinic (Dr. Singounas), “Evangelismos” Hospital, Athens, Greece; and the Department of Neurosurgery (Drs. Georgaculias and Jenkins), Newcastle General Hospital, UK.
A. Siafakas, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Drs. GatzonisStamboulis, and Siafakas), “Aeginition” Hospital, Athens Medical School; the Neurosurgery Clinic (Dr. Singounas), “Evangelismos” Hospital, Athens, Greece; and the Department of Neurosurgery (Drs. Georgaculias and Jenkins), Newcastle General Hospital, UK.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. S.D. Gatzonis, Aeginition Hospital, 72 Vas. Sofias Ave., 11528 Athens, Greece.

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Cited By
  1. Movement disorders associated with antiseizure medications: A systematic review, Epilepsy & Behavior, 131, (108693), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2022.108693
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  2. Adverse effects of antiepileptics potentially serious in individuals with severe motor and intellectual disabilities, Epilepsy & Seizure, 12, 1, (14-27), (2020).https://doi.org/10.3805/eands.12.14
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  3. Ocular dysfunctions and toxicities induced by antiepileptic medications: Types, pathogenic mechanisms, and treatment strategies, Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology, 12, 4, (309-328), (2019).https://doi.org/10.1080/17512433.2019.1591274
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  4. Oculogyric crises: Etiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches, Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, 36, (3-9), (2017).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2016.11.012
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  5. Oxcarbazepine, Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs, (415-422), (2016).https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-53717-1.01199-9
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  6. Eye movement disorders, Neuro-Ophthalmology, (551-586), (2010).https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-1-4160-2311-1.00016-0
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  7. Oxcarbazepine, Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs: The International Encyclopedia of Adverse Drug Reactions and Interactions, (2646-2648), (2006).https://doi.org/10.1016/B0-44-451005-2/00157-1
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  8. Antiepileptic drugs, , (82-99), (2001).https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-6080(01)80012-X
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  9. Oxcarbazepine, an antiepileptic agent, Clinical Therapeutics, 23, 5, (680-700), (2001).https://doi.org/10.1016/S0149-2918(01)80019-9
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