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Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether in selected patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion and initially normal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) measured with PET, subsequent changes of cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism occur during long-term follow-up and, if so, whether the changes are associated with atrophy of the corpus callosum or subsequent ischemic strokes.
Background: The course of the changes in cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism after ICA occlusion remain unclear. After ICA occlusion, an increase in OEF may increase the risk of cerebral ischemia, and an increase in cortical ischemia would cause progression of callosal atrophy.
Methods: The authors used PET and MRI to examine twice seven medically treated patients with unilateral ICA occlusion and initially normal OEF at intervals ranging from 24 to 64 (mean ± SD, 42 ± 17) months. No intervening ischemic attacks occurred between the two examinations.
Results: In the hemisphere with ICA occlusion, OEF increased and blood flow decreased during follow-up. At the follow-up evaluation, abnormally increased OEF values were found in three patients, in whom ipsilateral ischemic strokes occurred during subsequent follow-up (18 ± 6 months). A decrease in oxygen metabolism also occurred and was significantly correlated with the decrease of callosal size.
Conclusions: These preliminary findings in a small, selected patient sample suggest that in patients with ICA occlusion and initially normal OEF, deteriorations of cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism during long-term follow-up may be associated with callosal atrophy or subsequent ischemic strokes.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 54Number 11June 13, 2000
Pages: 2095-2102
PubMed: 10851369

Publication History

Received: November 19, 1999
Accepted: February 29, 2000
Published online: June 13, 2000
Published in print: June 13, 2000

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

H. Yamauchi, MD, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
H. Fukuyama, MD, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
Y. Nagahama, MD, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
C. Oyanagi, MD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
H. Okazawa, MD, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
M. Ueno, MD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
J. Konishi, MD, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.
H. Shio, MD, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Yamauchi and Oyanagi)Brain Pathophysiology (Drs. Fukuyama and Nagahama), and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Drs. Okazawa, Ueno, and Konishi), Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto; and the Research Institute (Drs. Yamauchi, Okazawa, and Shio), Shiga Medical Center, Moriyama, Japan.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Hiroshi Yamauchi, Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center, 5-4-30 Moriyama, Moriyama-city, Shiga 524-8524, Japan; e-mail: [email protected].

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