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Brief Communications
May 28, 2002

Headache diagnoses in patients with treated idiopathic intracranial hypertension

May 28, 2002 issue
58 (10) 1551-1553

Abstract

The authors reviewed medical records of 82 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) to determine the frequency of headaches occurring after initial diagnosis and treatment of IIH, classifiable by the International Headache Society guidelines. Sixty-eight percent of patients had definable headache disorders, including episodic tension type headache (30%) and migraine without aura (20%). Patients with IIH frequently have other types of headaches, not necessarily related to increased intracranial pressure.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 58Number 10May 28, 2002
Pages: 1551-1553
PubMed: 12034799

Publication History

Received: July 27, 2001
Accepted: February 5, 2002
Published online: May 28, 2002
Published in print: May 28, 2002

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

Deborah I. Friedman, MD
From the Department of Neurology (Dr. Friedman and E. Rausch) and Ophthalmology (Dr. Friedman), State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse.
Elizabeth A. Rausch, BA
From the Department of Neurology (Dr. Friedman and E. Rausch) and Ophthalmology (Dr. Friedman), State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Deborah I. Friedman, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave., Rochester, NY 14642.

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Cited By
  1. Combined Invasive Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Chronic Post-Intracranial Disorder Headache: A Case Report, Clinics and Practice, 13, 1, (297-304), (2023).https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract13010027
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  2. MRI features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension are not prognostic of visual and headache outcome, The Journal of Headache and Pain, 24, 1, (2023).https://doi.org/10.1186/s10194-023-01641-x
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  3. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with migraine phenotype is associated with unfavorable headache outcomes, Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain, 63, 5, (601-610), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1111/head.14478
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  4. Long-Term Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Patients, The Neurologist, 28, 2, (87-93), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1097/NRL.0000000000000446
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  5. Overlap and Differences in Migraine and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, Current Pain and Headache Reports, 27, 11, (653-662), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1007/s11916-023-01166-7
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  6. The Vienna idiopathic intracranial hypertension database—An Austrian registry, Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, (2023).https://doi.org/10.1007/s00508-023-02252-x
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  7. Pseudotumour cerebri due to phenytoin in a child, British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 88, 9, (4217-4219), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1111/bcp.15306
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  8. The impact of obesity-related raised intracranial pressure in rodents, Scientific Reports, 12, 1, (2022).https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-13181-6
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  9. Diagnose und Therapie der idiopathischen intrakraniellen Hypertension, InFo Neurologie + Psychiatrie, 24, 11, (28-36), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1007/s15005-022-3047-0
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  10. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri), Albert and Jakobiec's Principles and Practice of Ophthalmology, (4719-4735), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-42634-7_50
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