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March 1, 1980

Right hemisphere dominance for attention
The mechanism underlying hemispheric asymmetries of inattention (neglect)

March 1980 issue
30 (3) 327

Abstract

Because hemiinattention is most commonly caused by right parietal lesions, it is possible that the left hemisphere attends to contralateral stimuli whereas the right attends to both contralateral and ipsilateral stimuli. We gave lateralized visual stimuli to 12 normal subjects and recorded the electroencephalograms. Desynchronization was determined by comparing the alpha power 1 second before and 1 second after a lateralized visual stimulus. Although the left parietal lobe desynchronized most after right-sided stimuli, the right parietal lobe desynchronized equally after right or left stimuli. These findings support the hypothesis that the right hemisphere is dominant for attention.

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Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 30Number 3March 1980
Pages: 327
PubMed: 7189037

Publication History

Published online: March 1, 1980
Published in print: March 1980

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

Kenneth M. Heilman, M. D.
Department of Neurology, College of Medicine. University of Florida, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.
Thomas Van Den Abell, Ph.D.
Department of Neurology, College of Medicine. University of Florida, and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.

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