Skip to main content
AAN.com

Abstract

A prospective study of pseudoseizures using prolonged video-electroencephalographic (EEG) recording was carried out in 60 patients. Of 33 patients with episodes of uncertain mechanism, a diagnosis based on recorded episodes was made in 18 (55%). Twelve (36%) had pseudoseizures; 6 (18%) had epileptic seizures. Ten additional patients had epileptiform EEGs compatible with epilepsy. Of 27 patients with presumably uncontrolled epileptic seizures, 4 (15%) had recorded pseudoseizures. Prediction of the nature of the episode by the admitting neurologist was accurate in 67% of cases. Determination from observations of unit personnel and neurologists was correct in less than 80% of episodes.
These data suggest that pseudoseizures occur frequently in patients being evaluated for epilepsy or suspected epilepsy. The clinical differentiation between epileptic seizures and pseudoseizures is often inaccurate. This differentiation is facilitated by prolonged video-EEG recording.

Get full access to this article

View all available purchase options and get full access to this article.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 32Number 1January 1982
Pages: 18
PubMed: 7198729

Publication History

Published online: January 1, 1982
Published in print: January 1982

Permissions

Request permissions for this article.

Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

Don W. King, M.D.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.
Brian B. Gallagher, M.D., Ph.D.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.
Alice J. Murvin, R.N.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.
Dennis B. Smith, M.D.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.
Donald J. Marcus, M.D.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.
Lawrence C. Hartlage, Ph.D.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.
L. Charles Ward, III, Ph.D.
Departments of Neurology (Drs. King. Gallagher. Smith. Marcus. Hartlage. and Ms. Murvin) and Psychiatry, (Dr. Ward) Medical College of Georgia. Augusta, GA.

Metrics & Citations

Metrics

Citations

Download Citations

If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice. Select your manager software from the list below and click Download.

Cited By
  1. Brain network entropy, depression, and quality of life in people with traumatic brain injury and seizure disorders, Epilepsia Open, 9, 3, (969-980), (2024).https://doi.org/10.1002/epi4.12926
    Crossref
  2. Quantitative Electroencephalogram (qEEG) as a Natural and Non-Invasive Window into Living Brain and Mind in the Functional Continuum of Healthy and Pathological Conditions, Applied Sciences, 12, 19, (9560), (2022).https://doi.org/10.3390/app12199560
    Crossref
  3. Syncope and non‐epileptic attacks, Pathy's Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine, (664-673), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119484288.ch52
    Crossref
  4. Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Nonepileptic Seizures, Nature and Science of Sleep, Volume 13, (209-218), (2021).https://doi.org/10.2147/NSS.S289190
    Crossref
  5. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in the context of concurrent epilepsy – making the right diagnosis, Acta Epileptologica, 3, 1, (2021).https://doi.org/10.1186/s42494-021-00057-x
    Crossref
  6. Nonepileptic attack disorder and functional movement disorder: A clinical continuum?, Epilepsy & Behavior, 106, (107028), (2020).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.107028
    Crossref
  7. From conversion disorders to functional neurological disorders. Overcoming the rule-out diagnosis?, Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría (English ed.), 48, 3, (174-181), (2019).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rcpeng.2017.10.005
    Crossref
  8. Del trastorno conversivo a los trastornos neurológicos funcionales. ¿Superando el diagnóstico por descarte?, Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría, 48, 3, (174-181), (2019).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rcp.2017.10.005
    Crossref
  9. Characteristics of Children Hospitalized for Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures Due to Conversion Disorder Versus Epilepsy, Hospital Pediatrics, 8, 6, (321-329), (2018).https://doi.org/10.1542/hpeds.2017-0103
    Crossref
  10. Epilepsy and Hysteria, British Journal of Psychiatry, 149, 1, (28-37), (2018).https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.149.1.28
    Crossref
  11. See more
Loading...

View Options

Get Access

Login options

Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution to get full access on this article.

Personal login Institutional Login
Purchase Options

The neurology.org payment platform is currently offline. Our technical team is working as quickly as possible to restore service.

If you need immediate support or to place an order, please call or email customer service:

  • 1-800-638-3030 for U.S. customers - 8:30 - 7 pm ET (M-F)
  • 1-301-223-2300 for customers outside the U.S. - 8:30 - 7 pm ET (M-F)
  • [email protected]

We appreciate your patience during this time and apologize for any inconvenience.

View options

Full Text

View Full Text

Media

Figures

Other

Tables

Share

Share

Share article link

Share