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Abstract

We performed MRI volumetric measurements of the amygdala (AM) and hippocampal formation (HF) in a group of 43 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy not controlled by optimal drug treatment. Fifteen patients (35%) had a history of prolonged febrile convulsions (PFC) in early childhood; 30 patients underwent surgery, and histopathology was available in twenty-four. The mean values of AM and HF volumes ipsilateral to the EEG focus were significantly smaller than those of normal controls. The volumetric measurements showed a more pronounced atrophy of the AM in patients with a history of PFC, although the HF volumes were also smaller in this group. Patients with a history of PFC had a higher proportion of more severe mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) compared with those with no PFC. These findings confirm a correlation between early childhood PFC, the severity of atrophy of mesial structures, and MTS.

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Published In

Neurology®
Volume 43Number 6June 1993
Pages: 1083
PubMed: 8170546

Publication History

Published online: June 1, 1993
Published in print: June 1993

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Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

F. Cendes, MD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
F. Andermann, MD, FRCP(C)
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
F. Dubeau, MD, FRCP(C)
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
P. Gloor, MD, PhD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
A. Evans, PhD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
M. Jones-Gotman, PhD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
A. Olivier, MD, PhD, FRCS(C)
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
E. Andermann, MD, PhD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Y. Robitaille, MD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
I. Lopes-Cendes, MD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
T. Peters, PhD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
D. Melanson, MD
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

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  1. Alterations in Rat Hippocampal Glutamatergic System Properties after Prolonged Febrile Seizures, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 24, 23, (16875), (2023).https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242316875
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  2. Optogenetic activation of septal inhibitory cells abates focal seizures, Journal of Neurophysiology, 129, 5, (1218-1223), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00111.2023
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  3. Imaging of status epilepticus: Making the invisible visible. A prospective study on 206 patients, Epilepsy & Behavior, 141, (109130), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2023.109130
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  4. From prolonged febrile seizures to epilepsy: Potential contribution of HCN channels, Febrile Seizures, (251-271), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-89932-1.00020-2
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  5. Febrile status epilepticus-related epilepsy: Neuroinflammation and epigenetics, Febrile Seizures, (221-234), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-89932-1.00018-4
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  8. Microglia play beneficial roles in multiple experimental seizure models, Glia, 71, 7, (1699-1714), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1002/glia.24364
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  9. Considering the Role of Extracellular Matrix Molecules, in Particular Reelin, in Granule Cell Dispersion Related to Temporal Lobe Epilepsy, Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 10, (2022).https://doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2022.917575
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  10. Vascular topology and blood flow are acutely impacted by experimental febrile status epilepticus, Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, 43, 1, (84-98), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X221117625
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