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June 1, 1995

Increased iron‐related MRI contrast in the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease

June 1995 issue
45 (6) 1138-1143

Abstract

Article abstract—Elevated iron levels in the substantia nigra (SN) of the brain in Parkinson's disease (PD) may mediate lipid peroxidative reactions, promoting SN neuronal death. To assess SN iron accumulation in living PD patients and its relation to motor performance, we measured, in 13 nondemented PD patients and 10 normal control subjects, simple reaction time (SRT) and simple movement time (SMT), followed by head MRI in a 3-tesla system. We measured T2 and T2* in the right and left SN of all subjects and calculated R2‘, the relaxation rate due to local magnetic field in-homogeneities, from these values. Asymmetries of 1/T2 (R2), l/T2* (R2*), or R2’ versus asymmetries of SRT and SMT were assessed in eight PD subjects who had not taken anti-PD medication(s1 for 12 hours. The average of right and lef ϵ SN values for R2 was lower, and R2* and R2‘ were higher, in PD patients than in controls (R2, p = 0.046; R2*, p = 0.001; R2’, p < 0.001). R2‘ best predicted group differences. The asymmetry of SRT performance was highly correlated with asymmetries of SN R2* (0.91; p = 0.001) and R2’ (0.72; p = 0.03). These results strongly suggest that the increases in iron levels seen postmortem in the SN in PD are reflected in increased iron-related MRI contrast at 3 tesla in living PD patients. Correlations with motor performance in PD suggest that the clinical severity of PD may be related to SN iron accumulation.

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Published In

Neurology®
Volume 45Number 6June 1995
Pages: 1138-1143
PubMed: 7783878

Publication History

Published online: June 1, 1995
Published in print: June 1995

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J. M. Gorell, MD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Gorell, Ordidge, and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau) and Psychiatry (Dr. Brown) and the Division of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (N.M. Buderer), Henry Ford Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Detroit, MI; and the Department of Physics (Drs. Ordidge and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau), Oakland University, Rochester, MI.
R. J. Ordidge, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Gorell, Ordidge, and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau) and Psychiatry (Dr. Brown) and the Division of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (N.M. Buderer), Henry Ford Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Detroit, MI; and the Department of Physics (Drs. Ordidge and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau), Oakland University, Rochester, MI.
G. G. Brown, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Gorell, Ordidge, and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau) and Psychiatry (Dr. Brown) and the Division of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (N.M. Buderer), Henry Ford Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Detroit, MI; and the Department of Physics (Drs. Ordidge and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau), Oakland University, Rochester, MI.
J-C. Deniau, MS
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Gorell, Ordidge, and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau) and Psychiatry (Dr. Brown) and the Division of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (N.M. Buderer), Henry Ford Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Detroit, MI; and the Department of Physics (Drs. Ordidge and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau), Oakland University, Rochester, MI.
N. M. Buderer, MS
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Gorell, Ordidge, and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau) and Psychiatry (Dr. Brown) and the Division of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (N.M. Buderer), Henry Ford Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Detroit, MI; and the Department of Physics (Drs. Ordidge and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau), Oakland University, Rochester, MI.
J. A. Helpern, PhD
From the Departments of Neurology (Drs. Gorell, Ordidge, and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau) and Psychiatry (Dr. Brown) and the Division of Biostatistics and Research Epidemiology (N.M. Buderer), Henry Ford Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Detroit, MI; and the Department of Physics (Drs. Ordidge and Helpern, and J-C. Deniau), Oakland University, Rochester, MI.

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  2. Genetic impacts on nigral iron deposition in Parkinson's disease: A preliminary quantitative susceptibility mapping study, CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics, 29, 7, (1776-1784), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1111/cns.14135
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  3. Comparison of three magnetic resonance imaging measures of brain iron in healthy and cocaine use disorder participants, NMR in Biomedicine, (2023).https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.5072
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  6. Associations between moderate alcohol consumption, brain iron, and cognition in UK Biobank participants: Observational and mendelian randomization analyses, PLOS Medicine, 19, 7, (e1004039), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1004039
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  9. A brief history of brain iron accumulation in Parkinson disease and related disorders, Journal of Neural Transmission, 129, 5-6, (505-520), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1007/s00702-022-02505-5
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  10. The Critical Roleplay of Iron Neurochemistry in Progression of Parkinson’s Disease, Brain-Iron Cross Talk, (87-108), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-7327-7_5
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