Skip to main content
AAN.com
Articles
February 11, 2003

Ecological implications of ideomotor apraxia
Evidence from physical activities of daily living

February 11, 2003 issue
60 (3) 487-490

Abstract

Objective: To learn if ideomotor apraxia (IMA) adversely influences skilled acts in the environment and interferes with independent functioning after stroke.
Methods: The relationship between IMA severity, based on scores from a verbal gesture-to-command (pantomime) task, and the dependency score, as defined by increased caregiver assistance on the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), was investigated in 10 unilateral left hemisphere–damaged stroke patients and 10 matched control subjects.
Results: There was a significant relationship between apraxia severity and dependency in physical functioning (PSMS). Impairment on the PSMS in the patients with IMA could not be accounted for based on overall cognitive impairment, poststroke depression, content–conceptual errors, elementary motor impairment, lesion size, or stroke–test interval. Analysis of categories composing the PSMS revealed that the patients with apraxia had increased dependency in grooming, bathing, and toileting relative to age-matched control subjects.
Conclusions: These findings emphasize the ecological implications of apraxia and the need for rehabilitation strategies to improve the execution and efficiency of coordinated skilled movements in stroke patients with left hemisphere damage.

Get full access to this article

View all available purchase options and get full access to this article.

References

1.
Goldenberg G, Hagmann S. Therapy of activities of daily living in patients with apraxia. Neuropsychol Rehabil . 1998; 8: 123–141.
2.
Goldenberg G, Daumuller M, Hagmann S. Assessment and therapy of complex activities of daily living in apraxia. Neuropsychol Rehabil . 2001; 11: 147–169.
3.
Smania N, Girardi F, Domenciali C, et al. The rehabilitation of limb apraxia: a study in left-brain damaged patients. Arch Phys Med Rehabil . 2000; 81: 379–388.
4.
Geschwind N. The apraxias: neural mechanism of disorders of learned movement. Am Sci . 1975; 63: 188–195.
5.
Hanna–Pladdy B, Heilman KM, Foundas AL. Cortical and subcortical contributions to ideomotor apraxia: analysis of task demands and error types. Brain . 2001; 124: 2513–2527.
6.
Hanna–Pladdy B, Daniels SK, Fieselman MA, et al. Praxis lateralization: errors in right and left hemisphere stroke. Cortex . 2001; 37: 219–230.
7.
Heilman KM, Rothi LJ, Valenstein E. Two forms of ideomotor apraxia. Neurology . 1982; 32: 342–346.
8.
Heilman KM, Rothi LJG. Apraxia. In: Heilman KM, Valenstein E, eds. Clinical neuropsychology. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993: 141–164.
9.
Rothi LJG, Mack L, Verfaellie M, et al. Ideomotor apraxia: error pattern analysis. Aphasiology . 1988; 2: 381–388.
10.
Liepmann H. Uber die Storungen des Handels bei Gehirnkranken. Berlin: Karger, 1905.
11.
De Renzi E, Lucchelli F. Ideational apraxia. Brain . 1988; 111: 1173–1188.
12.
Ochipa C, Rothi LJ, Heilman KM. Conceptual apraxia in Alzheimer’s disease. Brain . 1992; 115: 1061–1071.
13.
Heilman KM, Maher LM, Greenwald ML, Rothi LJR. Conceptual apraxia from lateralized lesions. Neurology . 1997; 49: 457–464.
14.
Liepmann H. Das Krankheitsbild der Apraxia (“motorischen Asymbolie”) auf Grund eines Falles von einsetiger Apraxia. Berlin: Karger, 1900.
15.
Roy EA. Neuropsychological perspectives on apraxia and related action disorders. In: Magill RA, ed. Memory and control of action. Amsterdam: North Holland, 1983: 293–320.
16.
De Renzi E, Motti F, Nichelli P. Imitating gestures: a quantitative approach to ideomotor apraxia. Arch Neurol . 1980; 37: 6–10.
17.
Foundas AL, Macauley BL, Raymer AM, et al. Ecological implications of limb apraxia: evidence from mealtime behavior. J Int Neuropsych Soc . 1995; 1: 62–66.
18.
Poizner H, Mack L, Verfaellie M, et al. Three-dimensional computer graphic analysis of apraxia. Brain . 1990; 113: 85–101.
19.
Sundet K, Finset A, Reinvang I. Neuropsychological predictors in stroke rehabilitation. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol . 1988; 10: 363–379.
20.
Damasio H, Damasio AR. Lesion analysis in neuropsychology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
21.
Rasband W. Image J: Java Image Processing Program. Bethesda: National Institute of Mental Health, 1998.
22.
Folstein MF, Folstein SE, McHugh PR. “Mini-Mental State.” J Psychiatr Res . 1975; 12: 189–198.
23.
Kertesz A, Poole E. The aphasia quotient: the taxonomic approach to measurement of aphasic disability. Can J Neurosci . 1974; 1: 7–16.
24.
Briggs CG, Nebes RD. Patterns of hand preference in a student population. Cortex . 1975; 11: 230–238.
25.
Rothi LJG, Raymer AM, Ochipa C, et al. Florida Apraxia Battery (experimental edition), 1992, unpublished.
26.
Kaplan E. Gestural representation of implement usage: an organismic-development study. Doctoral dissertation. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International, 1968.
27.
Lawton MP, Brody EM. Assessment of older people: self-maintaining and instrumental activities of daily living. Gerontologist . 1969; 9: 179–186.
28.
Singh A, Black SE, Herrman N, et al. Functional and neuroanatomic correlations in poststroke depression: the Sunnybrook Stroke Study. Stroke . 2002; 31: 637–644.
29.
Baum B, Hall KM. Relationship between constructional praxis and dressing in the head-injured adult. Am J Occup Ther . 1981; 35: 438–442.
30.
Warren M. Relationship of constructional apraxia and body scheme disorders to dressing performance in adult CVA. Am J Occup Ther . 1981; 35: 431–437.
31.
Williams N. Correlation between copying ability and dressing activities in hemiplegia. Am J Phys Med . 1967; 46: 1332–1340.
32.
Maher LM, Rothi LJG, Greenwald ML. Treatment of gesture impairment: a single case. Am Speech Hear Assoc . 1991; 33: 195.Abstract.
33.
Ochipa C, Maher LM, Rothi LJG. Treatment of ideomotor apraxia. J Int Neuropsychol Soc . 1995; 2: 149.

Information & Authors

Information

Published In

Neurology®
Volume 60Number 3February 11, 2003
Pages: 487-490
PubMed: 12578932

Publication History

Received: February 26, 2002
Accepted: October 11, 2002
Published online: February 11, 2003
Published in print: February 11, 2003

Permissions

Request permissions for this article.

Authors

Affiliations & Disclosures

B. Hanna–Pladdy, PhD
From the Department of Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Disease Center (Dr. Hanna–Pladdy) and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Dr. Hanna-Pladdy), Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago; Department of Neurology (Dr. Heilman), University of Florida College of Medicine, and Neurology Service (Dr. Heilman), VA Medical Center, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry & Neurology (Dr. Foundas), Tulane College of Medicine, and Neurology Service (Dr. Foundas), VA Medical Center, New Orleans, LA.
K. M. Heilman, MD
From the Department of Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Disease Center (Dr. Hanna–Pladdy) and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Dr. Hanna-Pladdy), Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago; Department of Neurology (Dr. Heilman), University of Florida College of Medicine, and Neurology Service (Dr. Heilman), VA Medical Center, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry & Neurology (Dr. Foundas), Tulane College of Medicine, and Neurology Service (Dr. Foundas), VA Medical Center, New Orleans, LA.
A. L. Foundas, MD
From the Department of Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Disease Center (Dr. Hanna–Pladdy) and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Dr. Hanna-Pladdy), Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago; Department of Neurology (Dr. Heilman), University of Florida College of Medicine, and Neurology Service (Dr. Heilman), VA Medical Center, Gainesville; Department of Psychiatry & Neurology (Dr. Foundas), Tulane College of Medicine, and Neurology Service (Dr. Foundas), VA Medical Center, New Orleans, LA.

Notes

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Brenda Hanna–Pladdy, Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Northwestern University Medical School, 320 East Superior Street, Searle 11-504, Chicago, IL 60611; e-mail: [email protected]

Metrics & Citations

Metrics

Citations

Download Citations

If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice. Select your manager software from the list below and click Download.

Cited By
  1. Effects of limb apraxia intervention in patients with stroke: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 32, 2, (106921), (2023).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2022.106921
    Crossref
  2. Improved gesturing in left-hemispheric stroke by right inferior parietal theta burst stimulation, Frontiers in Neuroscience, 16, (2022).https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2022.998729
    Crossref
  3. The impact of apraxia and neglect on early rehabilitation outcome after stroke, Neurological Research and Practice, 4, 1, (2022).https://doi.org/10.1186/s42466-022-00211-x
    Crossref
  4. Evaluation of the Dementia Apraxia Test in Parkinson’s Disease Patients, Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 51, 3, (271-278), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1159/000525618
    Crossref
  5. Clinical Aspects of Apraxia, Encyclopedia of Behavioral Neuroscience, 2nd edition, (630-639), (2022).https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-819641-0.00139-0
    Crossref
  6. Rehabilitation of limb apraxia in patients following stroke: A systematic review, Applied Neuropsychology: Adult, 29, 6, (1658-1668), (2021).https://doi.org/10.1080/23279095.2021.1900188
    Crossref
  7. Body representation in people with apraxia post Stroke– an observational study, Brain Injury, 35, 4, (468-475), (2021).https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2021.1880637
    Crossref
  8. Anatomical correlates of recovery in apraxia: A longitudinal lesion-mapping study in stroke patients, Cortex, 142, (104-121), (2021).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2021.06.001
    Crossref
  9. The challenge of apraxia: Toward an operational definition?, Cortex, 141, (66-80), (2021).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2021.04.001
    Crossref
  10. The autocracy of meaning: Intact visuo-imitative processes may not compensate for meaningful gestures, Cortex, 138, (282-301), (2021).https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2021.01.023
    Crossref
  11. See more
Loading...

View Options

Get Access

Login options

Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution to get full access on this article.

Personal login Institutional Login
Purchase Options

Purchase this article to get full access to it.

Purchase Access, $39 for 24hr of access

View options

Full Text

View Full Text

Full Text HTML

View Full Text HTML

Media

Figures

Other

Tables

Share

Share

Share article link

Share